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Leaving Assets to Children in a Will

Leaving Assets to Children in a Will Image

I read that when making a will, I could leave my property to my children “per stripes.” Why is the law talking about us like we’re some kind of zebra?

The phrase is Latin and it is “per stirpes,” not “per stripes.” Some bits of property law are extremely ancient in origin and this is one of them.

Most people want their property to pass to their children, but they don’t consider a situation few of us care to think about. What should happen to our property if our children die before us?

If a child has died before the parent who leaves property through a will or trust, and that deceased child has passed without leaving any children, many would say that the property should be divided among the remaining children. That situation is pretty straightforward. Suppose that you had three children, and your will said to distribute the property to your children in equal shares “per stirpes.” Then one of your children died without children of their own. The “per stirpes” designation in your will would mean that your surviving children would split your property in two equal shares.

The complication comes, though, when one child has died leaving his or her own children. Let’s call those children “grandchildren.” Would you, as the parent leaving property, want those “grandchildren” to split the share you had intended for your now-deceased child?

That would be the simplest solution and that is what “per stirpes” would do. If you had three children, and one died leaving two “grandchildren,” your will would direct that your two surviving children would get one-third each, and the surviving “grandchildren” would get one-sixth each. That is distribution “per stirpes.” The phrase means “by the branch.”

The problem there, though, is that from the grandchildren’s point of view, they get less than the other grandchildren. There are a couple of other options we can discuss with you. Or, you can do like most people do, opt for “per stirpes,” and leave it at that.

Zebras have nothing to do with it.

Jason A. Penrod is only the 20th attorney to be Board Certified as an Elder Law Expert by the Florida Bar and the National Elder Law Foundation.  He is the founder of Family Elder Law (www.familyelderlaw.com) which has offices in Lakeland, Lake Wales, and Sebring, Florida.

  • National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys - Florida Family Elder Law

  • Life Care Planning Law Firms Association

  • Florida Family Elder Law Office

  • Family Elder Law Lakeland Florida Area Chamber of Commerce Member

  • Family Elder Law Lake Wales Florida Area Chamber of Commerce Council Member

  • Family Elder Law Greater Sebring Florida Chamber Of Commerce Member

  • Family Elder Law Florida Bar Certified

  • Family Elder Law Florida Elder Counsel Member

  • Life Care Planning Law Firms Association

  • Life Care Planning Law Firms Association

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